Home > Future of Journalism, Online Journalism > Provocative insights on the future of Journalism from ONA 2009

Provocative insights on the future of Journalism from ONA 2009


I was reviewing some clips from this month’s Online Journalism Association 2009 conference in San Francisco. A very impressive list of speakers at the conference I must say.

Here’s a Vimeo gallery of interviews from the conference. A few videos I’d highlight (they’re vey brief, so check them out. The first is the following 7 1/2 minute clip of a series of Journalists commenting on the state of Journalism:

There’s some really great commentary here, but I particularly liked the comments from American University’s David Johnson starting at 5:25. He provides some classic quotes:

I disagree that it’s been a rough year for Journalism. I think it’s possibly one of the best times to be a journalist in history. I think it’s a very bad time to be a corporate owner of a journalism company, or to have stock in a journalism company.

But for journalists, there’s never been a better way to tell a story than [using] the technology we have right now, for the people who are willing to engage in conversation instead of tell people what is going on.

I think that traditional publishers that are used to either broadcast their messages, or printing their messages, and having a passive audience, are not comfortable right now with the active, engaged audience that’s talking back to them.
The people who use the internet are making a choice right now to either tell the story themselves, arm themselves with more information, and tell the story in different ways.

Wow. That’s powerful stuff!

Here’s a second favorite video, which is a 3-minute clip of young journalism student talking about how their expectations have changed since embarking on their journalism careers:

Ahh the freshness and optimism of youth! Gotta love it. In fact, the conference had a Student Newsroom covering the event. What a great idea!

Finally, a 1 1/2 minute clip of Publishing 2’s Ryan Sholin on the importance of incorporating links into reporting, something I personally feel very passionate about:

Thoughts? Comments?

glenn

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